Tag: pedagogy

That Black Mirror Composition Syllabus. Finally.

This composition syllabus had a rather long gestational period. It was supposed to make an appearance in the fall of 2016.

Instead, Lemonade happened.

Which worked out fine. I had a great time teaching those composition sections around Beyoncé’s visual album, intersectional feminism, and pop culture more generally.

But because I get bored/distracted easily when teaching the same material repeatedly, I felt it was time to revisit my Black Mirror ideas, tweak as necessary, and roll out this sucker. Fortunately, the experience running those Lemonade sections – especially using student writing as course reading/response materials – helped me hone this iteration a bit more.… Read more

A Blog Post About Blogging & Social Media In Academia. Specifically Theatre. Featuring: Risks! Rewards! With an Appearance By: The Near-Criminal Neglect of Pedagogy Training in Grad School!

I went a-conferencing this past weekend, to the American Society for Theatre Research in Minneapolis (#astr16). I was invited to speak at a career session called Beyond the Journal: Social Media, Blogs, and Podcasts, with scholars Brian Herrera , as moderator and general theatre/social media/digital writing expert, and Pannill Camp, who spoke about the important and exciting On TAP podcast. It was pretty awesome to somehow get invited to this party (if a 7:30 am Sunday session can be considered a party. Indulge me.). Many thanks to the Career Sessions organizers for the invitation, should they ever stumble across this post.… Read more

The #LemonadeSyllabus & A Last Minute Switcheroo

The semester starts in less than two weeks, y’all. So what did I do, with my ready-to-go-syllabi, numerous writing deadlines, and paper-/committee-work looming over me, vulture-like?

I posted a proposition on social media that would lead me down the last-minute-abandonment-of-already-developed-syllabus road.

And yet, that is exactly what I ended up doing today.

 

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Of course, the major source of inspiration behind all this was Candice Benbow’s stunning, comprehensive, and wonderfully detailed/designed Lemonade Syllabus. I live in awe of this document.… Read more

The Future Is Fucked

The house was packed a week ago today, when physicist Michio Kaku visited LaGuardia. He came at the invitation of the NEH-funded faculty seminar at LaGuardia – Technology, Self, and Society. 1 Students were engaged by  his presentation, and there were long lines up the aisles of the auditorium to ask him questions (equally long were the lines for selfies and book-signings afterwards). This event was clearly a conversation starter, and Dr. Kaku gave our school community a lot to think (and talk) about. It was an important visit.

However. At one point during his talk, Dr. Kaku referred to a future where “perfect capitalism” exists – where consumers can custom order any item (his example was clothing) to be tailor-fit to their digitally stored body measurements.… Read more

Notes:

  1. Friend and colleague Dr. Naomi Stubbs brought this grant to our campus. This is my second year as part of the seminar, and it has been a wonderful venue for exchanging ideas – both in terms of my own scholarship and my teaching.

Online Discussions Using Slack

Later today, I will be sharing some of the challenges of discussion forums in a presentation at LaGuardia as part of the Center for Teaching and Learning’s mini-seminar series on Engaging Web 2.0 Resources & Technologies (slides for the talk are at the bottom of this post). Discussion boards are something I have struggled with quite a bit over the years: I only recently came to terms with online discussions, mainly because I found a tool – the chat platform Slack – and a structure that seems to encourage the kind of student-driven conversations I was aiming for.… Read more

Capstone Class: Digital Media Projects

For their culminating project, students in my Humanism, Science, and Technology class were asked to create some kind of creative digital media project that touched on our class themes. LIB 200 is the capstone class for Liberal Arts majors at LaGuardia, and our section focused specifically on AI in sci-fi films and TV shows. The students embraced the challenge, and I wanted to take a moment to show off their fabulous work. Working individually or in groups, they first pitched a proposal to the class – getting feedback and crowd-sourcing ideas. Next, they drafted a design plan (which included a research narrative), and then executed the project.… Read more

When Things Go Horribly Wrong

Ok, I will admit – this title seems like clickbait (in that a grand total of two more people than the usual five might read this). But I realized that this blog tends to present a rosy or optimistic depiction of my teaching. The constant self-reflection (mostly highly critical) and the failed attempts do not make their way into these posts as often as they probably should. This is probably a result of several things: a sense of self-preservation, the omni-present imposter syndrome academics tend to suffer from, and the fact that I tend to dissect and discuss the failures almost immediately with colleagues (typically over a shared bottle of wine, because I’m pretty sure this is the best way to discuss failure).… Read more

RTTP Faculty Workshop @ John Jay College

Many thanks to all the participants, the students, and my co-facilitators (Paula Lazrus at St. John’s University and Elizabeth Hovey at John Jay College, CUNY) for the Reacting to the Past faculty workshop at John Jay this past weekend. Sixteen faculty from nine colleges joined us to play the 1616 phase of The Trial of Galileo: Aristotelianism, the “New Cosmology,” and the Catholic Church, 1616-33. After the game, students from past Reacting classes at John Jay, St. John’s, and LaGuardia joined us for a Q & A session – and two of these students helped us during game play.… Read more

ATHE 2013 Prezi on Reacting to the Past, Pedagogy, & Performance

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Below is the Prezi I created for an ATHE 2013 panel on Pedagogy, Play, and the Undergraduate Theatre Classroom with Jim Wilson and Beth Schachter, with Shawna Mefferd Carroll as respondent. My presentation, “Playing with History: Role-Playing, Reacting to the Past, and Teaching Content via Performance,” was on Reacting to the Past pedagogy in theatre/performance and interdisciplinary classrooms.… Read more