Tag: pageants

Gettysburg Sesquicentennial: Day 2

Yesterday I watched the close of a commemorative march tracing the steps of the Confederate troops during Pickett’s Charge on July 3rd: thousands participated and watched, marking the space where these troops moved, on the very ground this assault took place. Monuments to the charge and its participants littered the field, providing shade for people and reminding us that this is, in fact, sacred ground. Edward Tabor Linenthal called Gettysburg – along with land of other seminal American battles (Lexington & Concord, Little Bighorn, etc.) – “sacred patriotic space,” or “pilgrimage sites,” where “memories of the transformative power of war and the sacrificial heroism of the warrior are preserved,” and those who visit “seek environmental intimacy in order to experience patriotic inspiration.” 1

In his chapter on Gettysburg, Linenthal goes on to describe the centennial Gettysburg celebrations, contextualizing it in terms of race relations in 1963.… Read more

Notes:

  1. Edward Tabor Linenthal, Sacred Ground: Americans and Their Battlefields (Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1993), 3.
  2. Ibid., 99.
  3. Ibid., 100.

Charles Sager’s The Negro; or, a Largely Overlooked Turn-of-the-Century Pageant

Researching black performance in the late nineteenth century poses a host of problems for a theatre historian. The archive is, at best, spotty, though there have been many excellent recent attempts to redress these gaps. In my efforts to find plays and productions speaking to slavery and Civil War memories staged by black performers in the late nineteenth/early twentieth century, I found a short but tantalizing bit about Charles Sager’s production The Negro (1899) in Errol G. Hill and James V. Hatch’s A History of African American Theatre. 1 I decided the production merited a bit more digging, as it was a rare example of black history staged for a larger audience around the turn-of-the-century, when touring plantation shows were the most popular modes of black performance.… Read more

Notes:

  1. See Errol G. Hill, “New Vistas: Plays, Spectacles, Musicals, and Opera,” A History of African American Theatre, eds. Errol G. Hill and James V. Hatch’s (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2003), 140.